Tag Archives: 2013

2013 in Review

Every year, the folks at WordPress prepare an annual report for our blog. Check out our fantastic 2013 stats! And happy New Year to all of our fabulous readers!

Click here to see the report.

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Graphic Novels with Matthew Murray

SLAIS student Matthew Murray explains Adult Graphic Novels at our 2013 RA in a Half Day on Oct. 30th at Vancouver Public Library:

Adult Graphic Novels Resources:

Awards

American Awards:
Eisner Awards
• Most extensive awards
• Many different categories
www.comic-con.org/awards/eisners-current-info
Harvey Awards
• Voted on by comic book industry professionals
www.harveyawards.org
Ignatz Awards
• Generally focus on “indie” comics and creators
• Small press creators or creator-owned projects published by larger publishers

Canadian Awards:
Doug Wright Awards
• Awarded to “alternative” comics and creators
• Best Book Award
• Best Emerging Talent
Joe Shuster Awards
• More “mainstream” comics (ie. superhero)
• Awards for best writer, artist, cartoonist, etc.

Publishers

Dark Horse
IDW
Image
• The third through fifth biggest comic book publishers in America (after Marvel and DC)
• Major sources of genre (science fiction, etc.) graphic novels
• Publish many media adaptations
• Dark Horse also publish manga

Drawn & Quarterly
• Canadian literary/artistic publisher
• Publish manga/international work
Fantagraphics
• “Alternative” comics publisher
Oni Press
• Small, well-respected popular fiction publisher
Dynamite
• Publish many adaptations of existing books and movies
Vertigo
• DC’s “mature readers” imprint
Viz Media
• Leading manga publisher

Best Seller Lists
Comixology
• Website where users (not librarians) can buy access to comics
• Lists what’s currently selling well digitally
www.comixology.com/comics-best-sellers
Diamond Comics
• The biggest comic book and graphic novel distributor in North America
• They release monthly lists on their website of the top selling graphic novels, manga, and comic books
• Reports sales to comic book shops
www.diamondcomics.com (click on Industry Statistics in the sidebar).
The New York Times
• Features weekly lists
• Reports sales through bookstores and websites
• Paperback: www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/paperback-graphic-books/list.html
• Hardback: www.nytimes.com/best-sellers-books/2010-07-11/hardcover-graphic-books/list.html
Reviews, News, and Info
Comics Alliance
comicsalliance.com
Comics Beat
comicsbeat.com
The Comics Journal
www.tcj.com
Diamond Bookshelf
www.diamondbookshelf.com
Graphic Novel Reporter
www.graphicnovelreporter.com
Publishers Weekly
www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/industry-news/comics/

Previews
Comixology
• Features free digital previews and sample issues
www.comixology.com
Net Galley
• Offers digital galley proofs of upcoming grapic novels
www.netgalley.com
Developed and Presented by Matthew Murray
thematthewmurray@gmail.com
thematthewmurray.weebly.com

 

Self Help with Jenny Fry

Jenny Fry, from Surrey Libraries, gives us the run-down on Self-help books at RA in a Half Day:

Genre Title: Self-Help

Presented by: Jenny Fry (City Centre Library, Surrey Libraries)

Description of Genre: From Wikipedia: Self-help, or self-improvement, is a self-guided improvement—economically, intellectually, or emotionally—often with a substantial psychological basis. Many different self-help groups exist and each has its own focus, techniques, associated beliefs, proponents and in some cases, leaders. Alcoholics Anonymous, probably the best known self-help culture has given us new language: recovery, dysfunctional families, and codependency. Self-help is about getting information, finding a support group, maybe on the Internet or in person, where people in similar situations join together. Potential benefits of self-help groups include friendship, emotional support, experiential knowledge, identity, meaningful roles, and a sense of belonging.

  • psychology 150s
  • co-dependency 158.2, 362.29, 613.8, 616.86
  • success/healing/change 158.1
  • depression/mental illness 616.8527
  • anxiety 616.85233, 152.46
  • relationships 158.2, 306.7, 362.837
  • memory 153.1, 616.89
  • addiction/recovery 616.8527
  • techniques 158.1, 305.42, 616.85223, 616.8527
  • emotions 152.4, 158.1082
  • grief 155.937
  • dating advice 646.77
  • parenting 649
  • business books have a lot of self-help for people who don’t want to read self-help books 650.1
  • novels & poetry

Important titles and authors:

  • 50 Self-Help Classics – Tom Butler-Bowdon
  • How to Read How-To and Self-Help Books: getting real results from the advice you get – Janne Ruokonen

Well-known authors: Dale Carnegie, Robert Atkins, Dalai Lama, Stephen R. Covey, Suze Orman, Anthony Robbins, Wayne Dyer, Eckart Tolle, Deepak Chopra, Gail Vaz-Oxlade, Mitch Albom

Helpful resources

BookLists:

Other tips:

Common misconceptions:

  • “It’s a cult” – good self-help is not a cult
  • I’m too smart to need self-help” – take a chance that it will cover the basics, embrace humility and the power of simple ideas repeated, you don’t know everything, you can’t, no one can
  • “I read it and it didn’t work” – there is no magic, you have to make it work.

Criteria for Evaluating Multicultural Self-Help and Guidance:

  • Tailored guidance: does the author offer advice that is special to the targeted audience?
  • Accuracy: does the author offer advice that is accurate, ethical, feasible and appropriate?  Does the advice conform to established norms in the field?
  • Form and features: non-fiction readers have an expectation and a preference for checklists, forms, self-tests, lists, and examples [From: Non-Fiction Readers’ Advisory, edited by Robert Burgin, Chapter 10: Books That Inspire: Nonfiction for a Multicultural Society by Alma Dawson and Connie Van Fleet, p 191]

Self-help is the development of your potential, including beliefs, goal setting, learning new habits, making positive changes re: your mental attitude and your ideas. We live in a state of constant learning for new skills and habits. We need to have a healthy dose of realism: if it sounds too good to be true, it is.

The most successful people seek new knowledge, internalize it and turn what they know into effective action. You often need someone else to tell you what you already know because it reinforces the ideas and the message, which helps you internalize it. Taking action doesn’t guarantee success but it boosts the odds.

There are not necessarily clear-cut answers or solutions to certain issues – at best, you learn you aren’t alone, that you can live with it and look forward despite reality. Does it seem too simple to be true?  Does it seem like just commonsense? It will nonetheless require motivation and discipline to achieve.  A great deal of effort has gone into making it easily communicated and understood. Yes, there are scams, as there are everywhere.

The dirty little secret of Self-Help: everything works….for a while (placebo effect).  Just by intervening in the current situation or the status quo by focusing your attention, consciously paying attention will get some results.

The value lies in actually doing it, taking the advice, and making changes.  The most important thing: get started.  One book isn’t enough, use several.  Beware the quick fix – the quick fix may is rarely sustainable.  Jump-start your system.  Use your commonsense and be open to discovering new things.  Action produces initial changes.  Habits produce permanent changes.

When we are drowning in information, we benefit greatly from someone who can provide succinct key ideas in a structured and organized manner. Structure brings better results than willpower. Great ideas are not necessarily new ideas. Focus on the message, not the messenger.

Good self-help asks you a set of questions which leads to a diagnosis of your present situation and then sends you down the right course of action.

Life: your biggest DIY project.

Where Are You Going To Be May 10th?

Ever wondered how marketing principles could be used to expand your library’s readers’ advisory services to your community? And have you ever wondered what role libraries play in writers’ lives and wanted to connect with local authors from your own community? Anticipation is building as the BCLA conference draws near, and The BCLA Readers’ Advisory Group is very pleased to be hosting two sessions on Friday, May 10.

Readers’ Advisory Outside the Box: Marketing Experts Reveal Strategies on Promoting Books and Reading
Time: 1:30 pm

Organized by the BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group, a panel of experts from outside the world of libraries will weigh in on best practices and innovative ideas for marketing books and promoting reading. These experts from local marketing, publishing and art curating disciplines will discuss “out-of‐the‐box” marketing strategies, and how they can be applied in a library setting to appeal to customers and potential customers.

MONIQUE SHERRETT has a passion for all things digital, in particular digital marketing for publishing. She is the founder of Boxcar Marketing, an internet marketing company based in Vancouver BC. As the former internet marketing manager of Raincoast Books, she spearheaded major online marketing campaigns, including promotion of Harry Potter and the creation of the first Canadian publisher podcast and blog. Monique has developed websites and online community strategies for several Canadian publishers and trade associations. She is an adjunct professor at SFU.

LORNA BROWN is a Vancouver based artist, curator and writer with interests in the dynamics of public spaces, digital and print production and publishing, and conversation‐based events.

Recent independent projects include Digital Natives, a public artwork commissioned by the City of Vancouver: http://digitalnatives.othersights.ca/

Writers in the Library: Local Literati Speak to the Future of Libraries and their Influence on the Written Word
Time: 5:15 pm

The BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group is hosting an Author Panel. This 75 minute session will feature three local authors speaking to the conference theme, “Are We There Yet? Look to the future and be inspired by the present as you connect with your community to share ideas and learn.” We want to hear how local authors connect with the community and the library. Do libraries impact their life and work? How do they use libraries as places to write or as sources for research and information‐seeking? What do they perceive as the future of libraries? What can libraries do to assist?

BILLIE LIVINGSTON is the award‐winning author of three novels, a collection of short stories as well as a poetry collection. Her latest novel, One Good Hustle, a Globe and Mail Best Book selection, was longlisted for the 2012 Giller Prize and short‐listed for the CLA’s Young Adult book of the year. Her novella The Trouble with Marlene, has been adapted for a feature film and is currently in production.

JEN SOOKFONG LEE was born and raised in Vancouver’s East Side. Her books include The Better Mother, a finalist for the City of Vancouver Book Award,The End of East and Shelter, a novel for young adults. Her poetry, fiction and articles have appeared in a variety of magazines and anthologies. A popular radio personality, Jen was the voice behind CBC Radio One’s weekly writing column, Westcoast Words, for three years. She appears regularly as a contributor on The Next Chapter and is a frequent co-host of the Studio One Book Club.

STEVEN GALLOWAY is the author of three novels, most recently the The Cellist of Sarajevo. His work has been translated into over thirty languages and optioned for film, television and radio. The Confabulist, his fourth novel, will be published in February, 2014. He is a professor in the University of British Columbia’s Creative Writing Program.

The BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group looks forward to connecting with you at the conference. Just look for anyone wearing a lovely teal coloured “What R U Reading? button.