Category Archives: RA Groups

An update to our meeting schedule

Lionel Richie Hello

We now meet quarterly from 9:15 – 11 a.m. every 3rd Tuesday of January, April, July and October, in person or by teleconference (when possible).

Our next meeting is January 16th, 2018 at the Burnaby Public Library Bob Prittie Branch (near Metrotown) in the 3rd floor meeting room.

Thank you!

 

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Book Movement and organizing your book club

logoI was perusing the Adult Reading Round Table website, “a group dedicated to developing readers’ advisory skills and promoting reading for pleasure through public libraries in the Chicago area,” which I learned about in a webinar a few months ago. While reading about their leadership recommendations for book club leaders, I discovered a link to the website Book Movement. This website is a resource for book club groups–covering 35,000 book clubs across the United States and what books they recommend and why. In addition to learning about book club options and receiving weekly book club picks, you can track your club’s RSVPs and send out automatic reminders and reading guides via automatic emails. Although I have not joined this resource yet (more emails!?), I am following them on Facebook and would be curious to hear from anyone who participates in their services. Have you used www.bookmovement.com?

–Meghan S, Surrey Libraries

Book Club for Masochists

book club for masochistsMany members of the BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group are part of the Book Club for Masochists, a group they started while attending SLAIS to “become […] better librarians by reading books [they] hate!”

The premise is a good one for pushing you out of your comfort zone: each month they select a genre and members read a couple of books from that genre that they will share with the group.

They’ve got quite a few genres under their belt now including:

Space Opera
Aboriginal/Indigenous/First Nations
Christmas/Holiday
Cozy Mysteries
Books in Translation
Religion (non-fiction)
Psychological Thrillers
Technology (non-fiction)
Gothic Literature
Historical Romance

Read about their feedback on books—what they recommend for a particular genre and what they advise avoiding. This is a great resource for encouraging you to read something new or for helping you find a book for a patron in a genre with which you’re unfamiliar. Be sure to tune into their very first podcast, published March 17 2016 on the genre of Historical Romance: http://bookclub4m.tumblr.com/

Has anyone participated in a similar-themed book club?

-Meghan S, Surrey Libraries

 

Surrey Libraries Launched Diverse Books Challenge for Staff

piles of books.jpgThe January 2016 What Are You Reading blog post about Reading Challenges inspired us at Surrey Libraries to launch a staff challenge. We had been discussing ways in which we can encourage more diversity in our own reading habits and help our Surrey Libraries Book Blog be more reflective of the Surrey community. Therefore, we launched the Surrey Libraries Diverse Books Challenge for Staff!

This is a fun, optional reading challenge adapted from this tumblr post, which was inspired by the We Need Diverse Books movement. We are encouraging Surrey Libraries staff to read and submit reviews to the Surrey Libraries Books Blog for a chance to win prizes.

Here’s how it works:

1)      Participation is 100% voluntary

2)      Read books fitting one, two, or several of the criteria below. Read one book, read two books, read green books, read blue books. Feel emboldened to read books that fit more than one of the below criteria – intersectionality is encouraged!

3)      Write a short review for the Surrey Libraries Book Blog and email it to Meghan S. Mention that your book was read by participating in the “Surrey Libraries: We Read Diverse Books Challenge” and your name will be entered in a prize draw for a gift card.

4)      A draw slip will be entered for every review.

5)      The challenge is launching March 7th and ends May 8th

6)      Happy spring reading!

 

Challenge Criteria

  1. Surrey author
  2. Book translated from one of the top 5 unofficial languages of Surrey (i.e. Punjabi, Mandarin, Tagalog, Hindi, or Korean)
  3. BC author
  4. Canadian author
  5. Author of colour
  6. Female author
  7. First Nations author
  8. Graphic novel by a female author or author of colour
  9. Immigrant perspective
  10. LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans*, queer) – protagonist or author
  11. Mixed race author
  12. Over age of 70 – protagonist or author
  13. Physical disability or chronic illness – protagonist or author
  14. Positive portrayal of main character living with mental illness
  15. Exploration of a refugee experience
  16. Under 20 but written for the adult market – protagonist or author

We’re excited to hear about people’s diverse reading experiences!

-Meghan S, Naomi E, & Jenny F at Surrey Libraries

Loan Stars: A New Reader’s Advisory Initiative

loanstars2

Taking the lead from the American website www.libraryreads.org, Loan Stars is the new readers’ advisory service that allows library staff across Canada to collaboratively select their favourite forthcoming titles. Using CataList, the online catalogue tool available free to libraries, librarians can nominate their favourite picks, the most popular of which will be marketed to libraries and library users alike.

The details: 

  • LoanStars is available to all library staff (anybody with a library email address)
  • We will be launching voting in January with the goal of having the first LoanStars list in March or April.
  • Library staff can vote on their favourite pre-publication adult book, Fiction or Non-fiction. We may later have a juvenile list but right now we are keeping it to adult titles.

How to vote: 

  • Voting takes place in CataList (www.bnccatalist.ca), a free tool that allows library staff to access the most up-to-date publisher catalogues. Titles need to be listed in CataList in order for you to cast your vote.
  • Books need to be nominated a month prior to the publication date. i.e. books with a publication date of March need to voted on prior to February 1st. In this example, we will compile March lists in early February and circulate them to libraries – giving librarians an opportunity to vote.

How to get your hands on books: 

  • Librarians can vote on any book they wish to nominate pre-publication (which is in CataList)
  • Librarians can get digital galleys via NetGalley. On the CataList homepage there is a link to a NetGalley catalogue which is all NetGalley content that is available on CataList (check back often as there are new books available weekly)

For now, we recommend that librarians sign up to be added to the Loan Stars mailing list (www.loanstars.ca). They can also sign up with CataList and NetGalley and get ready to nominate books! We recommend focusing on titles that are coming out in the spring.

We need lots of participants!  Please consider being a part of this exciting new initiative.

For more information, contact:
Claire Westlake
North Vancouver District Public Library
westlakec@nvdpl.ca

BPL’s Summer Reads

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Every year, since 2007, Burnaby Public Library compiles a list of 100 titles to suggest to patrons during the summer. We call it Summer Reads. The person behind one of our most popular RA initiatives is Diane Sura, our Readers’ Advisory extraordinaire from the Bob Prittie Metrotown branch.

During the year, Diane jots down notes about the books she reads to make her task easier when Spring comes and it’s time to start working on the summer recommendations. Besides her own titles, she also asks staff for suggestions and searches the mainstream media book lists. She usually selects books that were published in the past couple of years.

There are five categories in the list: Canadian, Fun, Thought-Provoking, Get Away (travel, sci-fi, historical) and Just Good. “What fits into each category is pretty fluid, it’s more a way to manage the displays and lists,” says Diane.

The books must be available in trade paperback and they have to be titles we have in our catalogued collection (a great part of our paperbacks are uncatalogued). We buy extra copies for the program, put a Summer Reads sticker on the cover, and display them during the summer. Diane says we try to get a broad mix of genres, with 10-20% non-fiction. “While we do not pick ‘beach books’, we do try to pick books that are very ‘readable’ and gripping,” she adds.

We promote the list on our website under Staff Picks as an interactive PDF document. Some of our patrons like it so much they start asking about the Summer Reads before we start promoting it at the beginning of July. Diane reports “many people use the list as recommended reading for the entire year.”

Here are five books from this year’s list:

all-puny-sorrows

All My Puny Sorrows, by Miriam Toews
Yoli is desperate to prevent the suicide of her sister Elf, a celebrated and happily married pianist. Blending sadness and humour, this is a heartfelt account of Toews’ own tragedies.

ancillary-justice

Ancillary Justice, by Ann Leckie
Debut novel that has won every major sci-fi award. All that is left of the colossal starship Justice of Toren is Bereq and she is out for revenge.

delicious

Delicious!, by Ruth Reichl
When the iconic New York food magazine Delicious is shut down, newly hired Billie Breslin stays behind to man the complaints and recipe hotline, rather than return home.

brilliant-blunders

Brilliant Blunders, by Mario Livio
Drawing on the lives of five great scientists who have changed our understanding of life and the universe, Livio shows how the scientific method advances through error.

why-i-read

Why I read, by Wendy Lesser
Magazine editor Lesser draws on a lifetime of pleasure reading to describe her passion for literature. “Iconoclastic, conversational and full of insight.”

Share in the comments the RA programs/initiatives that you have in your library during the summer.

Image: Michael Coghlan

Ana Calabresi is an Auxiliary Librarian at Burnaby Public Library, she is crazy about reading lists.

Surrey Libraries’ Book Advisors

We recently launched a Readers’ Advisory service at Surrey Libraries very loosely based on Multnomah County Library’s My Librarian. On our Recommended Reads page, patrons can now learn about the Surrey Libraries Book Advisors and their reading interests and send us an email for book recommendations. For example, see Book Advisor Naomi’s bio below

BookAdvisorNaomi

Book Advisor Naomi:

Pop culture, historical true crime, politics, fiction with vivid characters, graphic novels, thrillers, horror, science fiction, fantasy, teen fiction, classics, ESL Readers

I have a confession to make… I am a pop culture devotee. I love nothing better than to brew a cup of tea, cuddle down on a couch, and binge-watch a season of Empire with gossip blog breaks. My reading interests follow suit – give me the page-turners with the larger-than-life characters. Wherever the top is, this book better be over it. I want vivid characters to love or love to hate and plotlines steeped in melodrama. I also enjoy listening to podcasts covering pop culture, current events or comedy. I’d be happy to recommend a couple!

We are excited to interact with our readers in another capacity and to see where this program takes us! Unlike Multnomah, this project is not specially funded, so we will be hosting it on a smaller scale and adapting the program and evaluating it as we go along. Any questions? Please email bookadvisor@surrey.ca