Category Archives: Community

Running Walking Book Clubs

When the BCLA Readers’ Advisory Interest Group minutes went out to the list-serv last week, I was excited to learn that Richmond Public Library will be leading a Walking Book Club this summer in partnership with the City of Richmond Parks. Participants will meet at a different park each month, June through August, to walk and talk as they discuss the book.

This idea sprang up betwprasanna-kumar-218699een me and a colleague in a discussion last spring–we didn’t get around to organizing it for last summer, but we were intrigued after we read about the program idea in a Programming Librarian post about the Roaming Readers Walking Club. We brainstormed partnering with the recreation centre attached to our library. What a great way to combine physical activity, literacy, love of reading, and community!

As a runner, my mind started wandering to how we could create a running book club–would people still be interested in discussing books as they ran, potentially out-of-breath, down the streets of Guildford in Surrey? Although we haven’t pursued either a walking or a running book club yet, the opportunity exists and it would complement the children’s BC Summer Reading Club theme: “Walk on the Wild Side.”

I’m curious to hear from you–have any of your libraries hosted walking book clubs or hosted other book clubs with a movement or physical activity component? As the first cherry blossoms finally start to appear in what has been a long west-coast winter, it feels like the perfect time to think about summer reading and outdoor book clubs!

-Meghan Savage, Information Services Librarian, Surrey Libraries

Reading Trumps Ignorance

Reading can often open our minds to the experiences of others in ways that our individual lived experience cannot. After the most recent election in the United States many libraries and readers have united to recommend books that can help  counter voices of prejudice and ignorance. #Resist.

Here is a selection of links to inform and inspire:

ICYMI:  Libraries Across Borders List – Books that Trump will never read – but you should
https://bclaconnect.ca/perspectives/2017/01/31/lac/

 

11 Books to Helps Us Make it Through a Trump Presidency
http://bookriot.com/2016/11/21/11-books-help-us-make-trump-presidency/

Donald Trump is afraid of Books
https://bookriot.com/2017/02/08/donald-trump-is-afraid-of-books/

Libraries Resist: A round-up of Tolerance, Social Justice and Resistance in US Libraries

http://bookriot.com/2017/02/10/libraries-resist-round-tolerance-social-justice-resistance-us-libraries/
San Francisco Public Library’s We Love Diverse Books program:

http://sfpl.org/releases/2017/01/06/san-francisco-public-library-celebrates-diversity-in-literature-we-love-diverse-books-january-2017-programs/
And: http://sfpl.org/pdf/book-and-materials/welovediversebooks.pdf

But, what about fake news, you ask? Try these:

How to spot fake news:
https://www.theguardian.com/media/2016/dec/18/what-is-fake-news-pizzagate

A Policy Proposal for driving out fake news and promoting better sources of journalism:
http://policyoptions.irpp.org/magazines/february-2017/de-institutionalization-fake-news-and-the-crisis-of-journalism/
Has your library used any of these ideas or similar to create displays, book lists or other RA activities?  Tell us in the comments.

Book Movement and organizing your book club

logoI was perusing the Adult Reading Round Table website, “a group dedicated to developing readers’ advisory skills and promoting reading for pleasure through public libraries in the Chicago area,” which I learned about in a webinar a few months ago. While reading about their leadership recommendations for book club leaders, I discovered a link to the website Book Movement. This website is a resource for book club groups–covering 35,000 book clubs across the United States and what books they recommend and why. In addition to learning about book club options and receiving weekly book club picks, you can track your club’s RSVPs and send out automatic reminders and reading guides via automatic emails. Although I have not joined this resource yet (more emails!?), I am following them on Facebook and would be curious to hear from anyone who participates in their services. Have you used www.bookmovement.com?

–Meghan S, Surrey Libraries

Loan Stars: A New Reader’s Advisory Initiative

loanstars2

Taking the lead from the American website www.libraryreads.org, Loan Stars is the new readers’ advisory service that allows library staff across Canada to collaboratively select their favourite forthcoming titles. Using CataList, the online catalogue tool available free to libraries, librarians can nominate their favourite picks, the most popular of which will be marketed to libraries and library users alike.

The details: 

  • LoanStars is available to all library staff (anybody with a library email address)
  • We will be launching voting in January with the goal of having the first LoanStars list in March or April.
  • Library staff can vote on their favourite pre-publication adult book, Fiction or Non-fiction. We may later have a juvenile list but right now we are keeping it to adult titles.

How to vote: 

  • Voting takes place in CataList (www.bnccatalist.ca), a free tool that allows library staff to access the most up-to-date publisher catalogues. Titles need to be listed in CataList in order for you to cast your vote.
  • Books need to be nominated a month prior to the publication date. i.e. books with a publication date of March need to voted on prior to February 1st. In this example, we will compile March lists in early February and circulate them to libraries – giving librarians an opportunity to vote.

How to get your hands on books: 

  • Librarians can vote on any book they wish to nominate pre-publication (which is in CataList)
  • Librarians can get digital galleys via NetGalley. On the CataList homepage there is a link to a NetGalley catalogue which is all NetGalley content that is available on CataList (check back often as there are new books available weekly)

For now, we recommend that librarians sign up to be added to the Loan Stars mailing list (www.loanstars.ca). They can also sign up with CataList and NetGalley and get ready to nominate books! We recommend focusing on titles that are coming out in the spring.

We need lots of participants!  Please consider being a part of this exciting new initiative.

For more information, contact:
Claire Westlake
North Vancouver District Public Library
westlakec@nvdpl.ca

The Challenge of Reading Challenges

Our library celebrates its 150th birthday this year, and as a gift to the community we created a book of 150 reading challenges, which replaced the Adult Summer Reading club we have done in previous years. Our intention was to create a marketing piece for the library that would showcase our collections and share our enthusiasm with everyone who uses the library.  Erin Watkins, our Manager of Programs and Community Development, was instrumental in getting this off the ground.  Thanks, Erin!

This is what we discovered while putting the booklet together:

150_RC_Slide

 

Many hands make light work. We had staff from multiple areas of the library contribute ideas for the challenges, but we had one person compile them. This allowed for diverse interests, collection areas and material types, which we hoped would appeal to a broader range of our community. The challenges were meant to encompass all aspects of our library’s collection in as many formats as possible to inspire people to move beyond their tried and true reading, viewing, and listening habits. Literacy is not just about books, and having the challenges touch on multiple formats will give people a chance to explore areas of the library that they may have previously ignored or been uninterested in. Having staff from all over the library contribute really helped set the groundwork for the challenges. Having one staff member compile the results was a way to ensure we kept to task and made it to our goal of 150 challenges – one for each year the library has been in existence.

Enthusiasm helps! Staff enthusiasm for a project like this helps us all see how diverse our colleagues and their interests are, which makes the workplace a fun place to be. It also means that we are better able to use that knowledge in a readers’ advisory situation because if we don’t share the reading interests of the patron in front of us, we can certainly find someone who does.

More heads are better than one. Collaborative work meant that wrangling 150 challenges into a semblance of order so they could be put into a booklet was much more effective. It also established a way for us to riff off each other’s ideas and build on each other’s work. One of the most exciting aspects of this format meant we could move beyond the familiar territory of the Adult Summer Reading club booklist and offer book bingo, a crossword puzzle, and a drawing challenge as well.

We have built in social media components in terms of a section of the challenge being called “Share” where we encourage community members to share their challenges with us on social media, and we have already had some really fun contributions for community members.

NWPL Instagram

If you are thinking of doing something similar at your library, don’t hesitate! Not only will it reinvigorate your passion for connecting with library users, but it will empower you to learn even more about the collection in your own library and inspire your own reading/viewing/listening habits. We can’t wait for the conversations we’re going to have with our library users: in the stacks, at the desk, on social media – all about what we love to watch, read, and listen to. It’s going to be a great summer!

What are your plans for adult summer reading inspiration at your library? Comment below so we can all be inspired!

Shelley Wilson-Roberts is the Public Services Librarian II at the New Westminster Public Library.

Surrey Libraries’ Book Advisors

We recently launched a Readers’ Advisory service at Surrey Libraries very loosely based on Multnomah County Library’s My Librarian. On our Recommended Reads page, patrons can now learn about the Surrey Libraries Book Advisors and their reading interests and send us an email for book recommendations. For example, see Book Advisor Naomi’s bio below

BookAdvisorNaomi

Book Advisor Naomi:

Pop culture, historical true crime, politics, fiction with vivid characters, graphic novels, thrillers, horror, science fiction, fantasy, teen fiction, classics, ESL Readers

I have a confession to make… I am a pop culture devotee. I love nothing better than to brew a cup of tea, cuddle down on a couch, and binge-watch a season of Empire with gossip blog breaks. My reading interests follow suit – give me the page-turners with the larger-than-life characters. Wherever the top is, this book better be over it. I want vivid characters to love or love to hate and plotlines steeped in melodrama. I also enjoy listening to podcasts covering pop culture, current events or comedy. I’d be happy to recommend a couple!

We are excited to interact with our readers in another capacity and to see where this program takes us! Unlike Multnomah, this project is not specially funded, so we will be hosting it on a smaller scale and adapting the program and evaluating it as we go along. Any questions? Please email bookadvisor@surrey.ca

Read Local BC

ReadLocalBCSponsored by The Association of Book Publishers of BC (ABPBC), Read Local BC is a campaign to encourage the public to support the local book industry by visiting libraries, and reading and purchasing BC books.

From April 8-22, Read Local BC will feature a media relations campaign, promotional materials (postcards, bookmarks, posters, bag stuffers and advertisements), and more than 20 author events throughout the province.

The ABPBC is inviting libraries and librarians to join in the fun. You can participate in Read Local BC in a number of ways:

  • Post a Read Local BC poster in your library;
  • Share Read Local BC buttons, bookmarks or postcards;
  • Host events with Read Local BC authors;
  • Create a display with Read Local BC materials and books;
  • Promote Read Local BC on your social media feeds.

The ABPBC is preparing a list of BC books that we will share with you in the weeks to come.

If your library would like to host an event for Read Local BC, or if you want more information about the campaign, email Natalie Hawryshkewich: natalie@books.bc.ca. Natalie will send you promotional material make sure that information about your events is passed on to the ABPBC’s communications company, ZG Communications, who will be coordinating media.

Check out the Campaign’s Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/ReadLocalBC

-Heidi Schiller, North Vancouver City Library