Twitter is a Boon to Readers’ Advisory

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Thank you to Twitter for the use of their logo.

My newest Readers’ Advisory discovery is Twitter. Specifically, the useful (and amusing) feeds written by library, publisher, author, and reviewer industry types. Yes, joining this platform in the dying days of 2012 means that I am very late to this social media game. However, since its launch in 2006, Twitter has matured and solidified into a much more organized game to join.

I have been surveying the landscape, sifting through the many “Best Of” Twitter lists (Thank you Mashable for this list of authors with great feeds and Media Bistro for their best book reviewers on Twitter) and noting that Twitter has become a natural habitat for many authors.

In follower mode, Twitter provides me with book recommendations, links to reviews and can be used as a collection development tool. By contributing my thoughts and opinions, I can extend my promotion of books beyond the patrons at my library, my family and friends. I like the sharing of common interests across Twitter by using hashtags (an ever-changing user-driven taxonomy allowing you to tag a topic or search for one.) Some bookish hashtags to follow or contribute to include:

#reading
#books
#fridayreads
#canadareads.

The National Reading Campaign‘s simple query #whatdidyoureadtoday garnered over 10,000 replies. While their contest has wrapped up, the conversation continues.

The Librarian Favorites, 2012 was a collaborative Twitter voting system. Hundreds of librarians tweeted close to 700 votes for their favourite 12 titles of 2012. Over 400 titles were recommended and the top three are: Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars
and Robin Sloan’s Mr. Penumbra’s 24 Hour Bookstore. The Early Word provided a spreadsheet of the complete listof librarian picks.

Other Reader’s Advisory possibilities for Twitter include using your library’s Twitter account for author reading promotion, developing networks for future event planning as well as taking the opportunity to understand and engage with understanding and engaging with readers.

For more on how to use Twitter for Reader’s Advisory take a look at this presentation on Twitter for Reader’s Advisory by Vassiliki Veros from New South Wales.

Are you on Twitter? Comments on using Twitter for RA purposes from newbies and experts are welcome!

You can find me @TaraMatsuzaki.

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One thought on “Twitter is a Boon to Readers’ Advisory

  1. Pingback: Exploring New Avenues for Readers’ Advisory | What Are You Reading?

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